'Future in mind' - the Taskforce Report main recommendations

Lizzie Bruce
Purestock_1574r-02725a
17 Mar 2015

‘Future in mind – promoting, protecting and improving our children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing’, the report of the government's Children and Young People’s Mental Health Taskforce, was launched today at the King’s Fund by Norman Lamb MP, Minister for Care and Support.

It provides a broad set of recommendations that, if implemented, would facilitate greater access and standards for CAMHS services, promote positive mental health and wellbeing for children and young people, greater system co-ordination and a significant improvement in meeting the mental health needs of children and young people from vulnerable backgrounds.

Below are some of the key recommendations from the report.

Schools

The recommendations from the report would have a clear impact on the role schools play in mental health promotion and the provision of mental health services for children and young people, these include:

  • providing a named CAMHS contact in all schools
  • involving schools in the local plans devised by Health and Wellbeing Boards
  • alternative treatment venues should be made available, in particular for children from vulnerable and hard to reach backgrounds
  • promotion of whole-school approach to fostering resilience within schools

Commissioning

In dealing with the issue of responsibility for commissioning and creating a clearer commissioning pathway, the Taskforce recommended the following:

  • increase co-commissioning for community and in-patient care with a view to moving away from the tiered model
  • local lead accountable commissioning body with single separate identifiable budget for children and young people’s mental health
  • design and implement a local plan for children and young people’s mental health in each commissioning area with inputs from all agencies, children and young people and their parents
  • increased commissioning of home treatment and other flexible services

Early Years

The Taskforce report includes quite a number of strong recommendations in the area of early years intervention and mental health promotion. These include:

  • every birthing unit to have a specialist perinatal mental health clinician by 2017
  • increased investment in early years health services and ensuring parents have access to evidence based interventions and support to strengthen attachment and avoid trauma
  • local authorities to invest in funding for early support initiatives and invest strategically in mental health services from 0-5 from Oct 2015
  • health visitors should receive updated training in mental health

Children and young people from vulnerable backgrounds

The Taskforce looked closely at the provision of services and meeting the needs of Looked after Children and children and young people from vulnerable backgrounds. The recommendations they came up with include:

  • remove the arbitrary age cut-off especially for Looked After Children and children and young people from vulnerable backgrounds
  • need for bespoke care pathways using evidence based interventions for children from minority and vulnerable backgrounds
  • alternative treatment venues should be made available, in particular for children from vulnerable and hard to reach backgrounds
  • shared assessment, case management and regular multi-agency case review processes for these young people
  • designated professionals to liaise with agencies and ensure that services are targeted and delivered in an integrated way for children and young people from vulnerable backgrounds

Improved access

In the area of improved service provision and access, the Taskforce report recommendations include:

  • developing  a nationally branded web based portal for children and young people, parents and teachers to access information and support
  • all GPs should have a named CAMHS contact
  • improve accessibility by practically applying the Department of Health “You’re Welcome” quality criteria for young people friendly health services
  • potentially extend CAMHS services to young people up to 25 years of age
  • best practice guidelines to be developed for CCGs and GPs around student transitions
  • increase in number of one-stop shops with single point of access systems based in the community
  • greater access to personal budgets for children and young people and their families
  • development of peer-support schemes with professional support

Data and standards

The Taskforce looked at the issues of data collection and standard setting and recommended the following:

  • a prevalence survey to be conducted by the Department of Health every 5 years which would produce data that can be analysed by characteristics such as ethnicity/deprivation/Looked after children etc.
  • the production of the CAMHS dataset which would collate key indicators, patient experience and patient outcomes would be a key priority at a national and local level
  • both the CQC and Ofsted should develop a joint cross inspectorate view of how system works together to improve outcomes

More information

Tags:
, , , , , , , , ,

1 Comment

  • lori
    about 1 year ago

    arbitrary cut off of access to camhs at 16. still.
    no or very limited provision for young people and children with additional ld or asd. generic services are not geared up to people who may experience communication problems.

Add a comment

Your email address will not appear on the site
(Tick to hide your name when this comment appears on the site)
This is to prevent us from receiving spam messages
Please wait...